By: Paul S. Cilwa Viewed: 7/23/2019
Occurred: 6/7/2018
Topics/Keywords: #Haleakalā #Hawaii #Maui #Travel Page Views: 147
Looking down at the world from over 10,000 feet above it.

Sunset from the top of Mount Haleakalā is a breathtaking, life-changing experience, or so I've heard. This morning, the sun rose while we were still sleeping in Hosmer's Grove. But that doesn't mean we didn't get to enjoy visiting the top in our own, sweet time!

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As one drives the final mile or so from the campground to the summit, one's attention is torn between the lofty heights above and the beautiful scenery below.

Paul S Cilwa

The Haleakalā Observatory, also known as the Haleakalā High Altitude Observatory Site, is Hawaii's first astronomical research observatory.

Paul S Cilwa
Paul S Cilwa

At the very summit is a structure that allows visitors to enjoy the view even in the case of inclement weather. That wouldn't be rain this high up; but the temperature can drop to 5°F.

Paul S Cilwa

Keith on the top of the world!

Paul S Cilwa
Paul S Cilwa
Paul S Cilwa

The summit house provides a 360° view.

Paul S Cilwa

Down below is the Visitor's Center and associated parking lot.

Paul S Cilwa

A tree grows on Haleakalā.

Paul S Cilwa

Contrary to popular belief, Haleakalā crater is not volcanic in origin, nor can it accurately be called a caldera (which is formed when the summit of a volcano collapses to form a depression). Scientists believe that Haleakalā's crater was formed when the headwalls of two large erosional valleys merged at the summit of the volcano. These valleys formed the two large gaps—Koʻolau on the north side and Kaupō on the south—on either side of the depression.

Paul S Cilwa
Paul S Cilwa
Paul S Cilwa

Life will find a way.

Paul S Cilwa

Coming down from the summit, we passed through the cloud layer.

Keith Jim