By: Paul S. Cilwa Viewed: 9/25/2020
Occurred: 8/26/2020
Topics/Keywords: #Coronavirus #Maui Page Views: 174
In which we learn that plastic ties aren't the equal of a thousand-pound bovine.

As you may recall, my grandson, Zach, fenced off a section adjacent to his ZachShack for the baby babana trees we transplanted a couple weeks ago. Zach returned to Arizona for a month, asking us to keep an eye on his banana garden. Well, the cows that graze our property apparently had their eye on it, too.

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Keith and I were driving up the hill to checkthe mail, when we discovered the banana garden fence had been breached in at least two locations.

In addition, one them must have kicked the water handle, because it was wide open; and she also managed to break the hose attached to it; so the garden, which is wet normally anyway, was pretty much flooded.

At least partially at fault: The plastic ties Zach used to attach the chicken wire to the fence posts weren't really up the challenge of keeping back a determined, thousand-pound, walking hamburger.

And, once caught in the enclosure, the poor ruminents had trouble getting out.

So Keith did what he could to shore up the fallen secttions of fence. But these posts are actually too flimsy to do the whole job. Kamanha, the rancher who grax\zes the cows, says stout wooden posts are needed at the corners, at least, to provide more stability. All, a strand of barbed wire should run along the top. The chiken wire is good for keeping out pigs, but the cows need something a little more convincing.

Hopefully this will do the trick, at least, until Zach returns to complete the job properly.